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  • Is Your Hash Being Passed?

     

    A typical day in IT:

    It’s another day-in-the-life of an IT administrator and you have yet another 1,000 problems to solve. Around noon you receive a ticket saying Bob is having trouble with his computer’s performance. Instead of grabbing lunch, you RDP into his computer to figure out the problem. You need admin credentials to see what’s going on, so you use your Domain Administrator account.  Turns out Bob needs to update a driver. It was a simple fix and you disconnect from the user’s computer, happy to have a couple minutes left to grab a sandwich.

    Later that day you see login alerts from your SIEM tool for several machines you don’t typically access. Alarmingly, they happened while you were picking up your sandwich. Your password is strong and well above the company’s password recommended length, including alphanumeric and symbols. How was it used?

    Turns out, the person who “borrowed” your credentials didn’t have to figure out your password. Instead, they infected Bob’s less secure computer and waited for you to log in using your Domain Administrator credentials. When you used RDP to enter Bob’s machine they captured the clear text hash of your password. Congratulations, your hash was passed.

    What is Pass-the-Hash?

    A Pass-the-Hash attack is where an attacker captures and uses the plain text hash of a user’s password instead of their plain text password. It allows an attacker to impersonate another user, typically a privileged account. This type of attack can affect ANY network using Windows machines. For the attacker, the advantage getting a hash instead of the password is it can be done without a brute-force attack, which is not as effective and takes a lot more time.

    How is the Hash acquired?

    Hashes can be acquired through a variety of methods, two being the most common. The first is to retrieve the hash from a SAM dump for the local machine users. The second is to grab the dump of a user’s credentials stored by Windows in the LSASS.exe process, allowing the attacker to retrieve the hash of any account that connects to the machine for example; an RDP-connected domain accounts. This is how the attacker compromised the Domain Administrator’s credentials from Bob’s computer in the scenario above.

    How can Secret Server mitigate the threat of Pass-the-Hash?

    While Pass-the-Hash attacks have existed for the last 17 years, the threat is now bigger than ever, with tools to exploit this vulnerability continuously improving. Currently the best way to protect yourself from a Pass-the-Hash threat is to upgrade to Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2. The new Windows updates have built-in security measures, including making the LSASS.exe a protected process, adding new security identifiers, and changing RDP so it no longer stores the remote login’s credentials on the target machine.

    It is typically not practical to upgrade every computer in an organization quickly, and a network would still be vulnerable during the upgrade process. However, there are other protective measures that can be taken by using Secret Server. For example, organizations can use Secret Server’s Check Out feature and configure it to automatically change the password after each RDP session’s Check Out is complete. This would render any hash that was captured during the session useless; when the password is changed, the hash also changes. Secret Server can also restrict which computers can use an account by restricting the launcher inputs. These measures mitigate the chance of a Pass-the-Hash attacks by greatly reducing the amount of time a hash is valid and decreasing the computers accessible for attack on privileged accounts.

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